The Garry oak, along with many other oak species, thrive in the prairie oak habitat. Due to development, economic activity and the growth of invasive species and conifer trees, as much as 99% of the prairie oak ecosystem has been lost. Without a suitable habitat, Garry oaks have vanished from our landscapes.

The Lost Oaks of Oak Harbor

A lost Garry Oak tree at the Seawatch condos in Oak Harbor. It's unknown why the oak was removed during development in 2006.

This lighthouse was carved out of a mature Garry oak tree in Oak Harbor when Seawatch condos were built in 2006.

Lost oaks apartments in Oak Harbor

Aptly named signage in Oak Harbor.

Shadow of a lost Garry oak tree in Oak Harbor on NAS Whidbey Island Victory Terrace housing.

The shadow of a lost oak near Victory Terrace. The dead tree will be left in place to support wildlife.

Giant Garry oak on Keister family farm which later became known as the Post Office Tree. Circa late 1950’s. Photo credit Peggy Darst Townsdin collection.

Giant Garry oak on Keister family farm which later became known as the Post Office Tree. Circa late 1950’s. Photo credit Peggy Darst Townsdin collection.

Stump of majestic Oak Harbor Post Office Tree, 1684- 2013.

Stump of majestic Oak Harbor Post Office Tree, 1684- 2013. 

Lost Garry oak due in part to soil compaction from parking lot and pavement over roots.

Lost Garry oak due in part to soil compaction from parking lot and pavement over roots.

Oregon’s Oak A Vanishing Legacy

This video explores how the loss of habitat has threatened Oregon’s Garry oak population, known in Oregon by the name White oak.